Zen Theosophy
Modern Meditation
Ageless Wisdom

office@zentheosophy.com
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Meetup Icon

©2018 Zen Theosophy | Designed by Sara Tjan

SIGN UP FOR OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

COMMON TERMS

COMMON TERMS USED

IN ZEN THEOSOPHY

Because we draw upon a variety of sources in our discussions and meditations, the following list of definitions is provided for easy reference.

Ahamkara

ah•hahm•kah•rah

Self-identification, the part of the psyche that forms an idea of self, property, privacy, and ego. This is the most basic mote of animals and humans which demonstrate strong self-awareness and sentience. It can become more complex through the development of Buddhi.

Buddhi

buhd•hih

Comprehensive reason. This is an outgrowth of manas and is a major organizational and intuitive part of the psyche. Buddhist allows us not only to develop logic, but also see it in relation to more subtle factors, including empathy, circumstance, etc, and extrapolate wisdom from that experience. It aids in developing a more complex form of ahamkara.

Citta

chit•tah

The subjective mental state of an individual. The chitta is made up of many constituent thoughts and ideas, and is a reflection of the multitude of factors affecting oneself. Citta is a development of ahamkara which facilitates the complex growth of one's psyche.

Hesychasm

hes•see•kasm

An Eastern Orthodox Christian practice very similar to samatha, involving manifesting inner silence in order to hear God.

Indriya

ihn•drih•yah

An sensory part of psyche. Indriyas are numerous, though often simplified for the sake of study and discussion, related as a sense of touch, taste, smell, etc. In reality, the indriyas have enormous permutations and affect all parts of our psyche. An indriya is a node through which we receive and transmit sensory data to and from our consciousness.

Manas

mah•nahs

General cognition. The ability to follow and create paths of logic, interpret data, and work out day to day life. Manas is a development of the citta into more logical forms, helping to sort the data that the citta encounters. It overcomes instinctual forms of intelligence and moves into more conscious modes.

Mantra

mahn•trah

Recitation of specific syllables to help train the mind into remembering certain patterns of meditation.

Metta Bhavana

meht•tah bahv•anah

An exercise used following vipasanna to generate empathy towards one's fellow beings.

Mudra

muh•drah

Generally understood as a hand gesture made during a meditation to help remember or reinforce certain concepts central to the practice.

Sadhana

sah•dha•nah

A particular method of yoga which a person has devised for themselves to follow.

Samatha / Shamatha

sha•mat•ha

This is generally called Centring Meditation for our uses. It uses techniques to calm the mind and make it a peaceful place, in order to prepare it for other meditations. It is generally held as one of the two key methods used in all Buddhist meditation.

Sutta / Sutra

suh•trah

A Buddhist or Hindu teaching.

Vipassana / Vipasyana

vih•pas•sah•nah

This is generally called Insight Meditation for our uses. It is an analytical form of meditation which focuses seeing clearly into an issue such as one's own behaviour, a problem in one's life, or other such situations. This is generally held as one of the two key methods used in all Buddhist meditation.

Viññana / Vijñana

vih•gya•nah

Consciousness as a holistic concept. It affords us a bird's-eye view of the four constituent properties (ahamkara, citta, manas, and buddhi) as they mature through our practice, as well as manifestations of consciousness not strictly defined through these definitions.

Wu/Mu

A form of samatha meditation used primarily in Zen practice. It focuses specifically on quieting the mind and centring using a Kung'an/Koan – an obtuse question or idea with which to train the mind.

Yoga

yo•gah

Practice, in the most basic terms. Yoga is more specifically about developing one's psyche, body, or both along particular lines. When engaged in a specific form, this is called a sadhana or method.

The Seal of Zen Theosophy